No. 143: Three AM Reads: Falling Commodity Prices | Kenyan Regulators Split over Bitcoin | IMF Making the Rounds

Coffee Prices Are Going to Drop 6% This Year, But My Americano Will Still Be $4

The World Bank put out its forecasts for global commodity prices last week, and it expects coffee, cocoa, and tea prices to fall 6%. Ivory Coast’s President Ouattara recently called on the country’s cocoa farmers to increase their output and quality of their beans in light of falling cocoa prices. Apparently, greater-than-expected supply of these commodities is driving the price drop, so I’m not sure how increasing output helps with that. Feel free to send me notes explaining that. Increasing cocoa bean quality could help with competitiveness in a crowded market, but cocoa is such a slow developing crop that expectations for quality to improve in a year is not realistic.

Kenyan Regulators Split on Virtual Currencies  

The Central Bank of Kenya and the Capital Markets Authority don’t agree on the use of virtual currencies like Bitcoin in Kenya. The CBK argues that the unregulated nature of Bitcoin exchanges leaves users vulnerable to losses, while the CMA has left the door open for the regulator and fintech players to feel each other out and determine how to move forward with the potential use of Bitcoin in the country. To be clear, Bitcoin startups like Bitpesa are operating in Kenya, though not without challenges. Last year, the Central Bank of Kenya effectively shut down Bitpesa’s operations by shutting down its bank accounts. Ultimately, both regulators will figure out what to do about virtual currencies. Hopefully, they won’t find themselves flat-footed like they did during the rise of mobile payments platforms.

IMF is Making It’s Rounds – Egypt, then Zambia

The IMF has a team in Egypt currently discussing a $1.7B loan, expected to be disbursed in June. Next up, Zambia is slated to continue talks with the IMF this month for a $1.6B loan. The IMF has been working with Mozambique in dealing with it’s hidden debt issue. In all, there are about 20 African countries that have taken money from the IMF. I look forward to seeing that number decrease significantly over the next decade. We’ll see how realistic of a hope that is.