No. 11: 3 Thursday AM Reads – VW Scandal | New African Development Bank Chief of Staff | Zero to One

  1. You’ve probably seen the news of Martin Winterkorn’s resignation from his CEO post at the Volkswagen Group. Rough year for this guy. Earlier in the year, VW Group supervisory board chair Ferdinand Piech publicly stated that there was distance between him and Winterkorn. I wonder if anything related to this discovery of VW vehicles emitting pollutants up to 40 times the legal amount contributed to that distance. Look for Andrew Ross Sorkin to analyze Winterkorn’s apology (or lack thereof), and Harvard Business School to put out some case studies on leadership, the impact of government regulation on commerce, family-controlled businesses, and trust.

  2. New African Development Bank President Akinwumi Adesina announced yesterday that Dr. Sipho Moyo would be his Chief of Staff. My Howard University alum friends will like this, considering that she did quite a bit of graduate work there. Add Dr. Moyo to the list of women I’ll be pointing my daughter to. (As an aside, the little one has been killing it at school. She turns three in a couple weeks and is the youngest in her class that has students who will turn six during the school year. The feedback has been shock that she is so young, yet so vocal. That’s my girl!)

  3. I just finished up Zero to One by Peter Thiel. It’s provides helpful insight into how one of the most successful Silicon Valley entrepreneurs/investors thinks. In unpacking his perspective on the ingredients to building a company as meaningful as Facebook, PayPal, Palantir, and Netscape, he traces the evolution of the technology industry before and after the dot com bubble and addresses how our society tracks individuals to not put together the building blocks necessary to do big things. At a more granular level, he gives his perspective on building technology, marketing, creating a team of people who know each other really well, and the list goes on. I will probably give this one another read. Some of the thinking in the technology world is pretty fascinating. Some of it is a bit scary. The concept of singularity, for example, is something I need to chew on. Basically, it is that concept of humans transcending our limitations exponentially thanks to technology. Here’s Singularity evangelist Ray Kurzweil discussing the idea. Nassim Nicholas Taleb, author of Antifragile – the book I mentioned in my last post, says not nice things about Kurzweil in the book. Essentially, Taleb is all about stripping away things that he thinks make us die sooner – technology, GMOs, etc. Kurzweil is all about building tools that he thinks will make us immortal – technology, GMOs, etc.

Three Podcasts That Will Make Your Daily Commute Amazing

While working on #NewRulesAfrica last year with Cherae Robinson (Be sure to check out her app Tastemakers Africa), I discovered that there are interesting people who interview other interesting people and post those interviews on platforms like iTunes and TuneIn Radio – for free. I now listen to at least five hours of podcasts a week during my commutes to my daughter’s school and the amount of insight I have gotten into the worlds of authors, other entrepreneurs, and investors has been amazing. I used to listen to Bloomberg Surveillance and Taking Stock with Pimm Foxx on the Bloomberg Radio+ app during these listening times, but find the podcast deep dives much more rewarding.

The Leaders

Here are three podcasts that I think you would find worthwhile to check out:

This Week in Startups – Jason Calacanis is a media entrepreneur and angel investor. He has invested in at least 90 startups, including Uber. He has no qualms about making his feelings known about certain companies like Google and Secret, which I appreciate. He opened my eyes to the value of listening to podcasts. Start with his interview with Angela Benton, founder of NewMe Accelerator. I listened to his interview with Chamath Palihapitiya at least four times.

The Entrepreneurs Library – Wade Danielson interviews business authors about their books, getting them to walk through what each chapter of the book is about, portions of it that a reader should definitely take a look at, and solicits their recommendations of other books to read. He probably could improve as an interviewer, but I do like that he gets out of the way and lets the authors do all the talking. His interview with Robert Galford on his book, The Trusted Advisor was really good. Galford flips the script on “name it and claim it”.

Marketplace – I have listened to Kai Ryssdal for years now, though my consumption was dependent on my ability to get in the car at the right time. The episodes are equally entertaining and informative – providing you with a snapshot of what happened that day and of broader issues like gentrification.

Runner-Ups

Here are a few more that I listen to, though I am not blown away by every interview like the two above:

Eventual Millionaire – Jaime Tardy brings on a lot of entrepreneurs who have bootstrapped and hustled their way to high revenue generating businesses.

The Strategic Entrepreneur – I met Michael Williams years ago through a mutual friend and was thrilled to discover his podcast.

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast – Some pretty insightful interviews here on issues like the United States’ criminal justice system.

Freakonomics Radio – The show’s deep dives on issues like education are pretty eye-opening.

HBR Ideacast – The content is typically pretty solid. Check out the interview with Boris Johnson, London’s mayor.

Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders – These are interesting fireside chat conversations with some of the leaders of Silicon Valley.

A16Z Podcast – Andreesen Horowitz is one of the top venture capital firms in the United States, despite their relative youth compared to stalwarts like Sequoia Capital.

The School of Greatness – This podcast may move up to the “you should definitely listen to this” list, for the sole reason that Lewis Howes takes the time to affirm each interviewee at the end of every episode. He nearly brought Baratunde Thurston to tears.

Start With Why – This is another one that may move up. I appreciate Simon Sinek’s laser focus on gaining clarity on why one does the business she does.

The James Altucher Show – I enjoyed James’ interview style for a long time, then I noticed that I felt like he was pushing his “Choose Yourself” framework onto other people’s work during the interviews and lost a bit of interest.

The Tim Ferriss Show – For a while, I really enjoyed the podcast. Tim did a few shows where he did not interview anyone, and I lost interest.